The Phoenix Diary
  
The Phoenix Diary
Published:
6/11/2015
Format:
E-Book (available as PDF files) What's This
Size:
6x9
ISBN:
978-1-46300-645-7
A half century after the oil runs out, America is a land of farming towns; decomposing cities; and vast, mostly uninhabited areas. Old people tell tales of the Modern Times and how they survived the period of collapse, while their grandchildren dream of the magic and technology lost to them. In this time, legends speak of the Phoenix Diary, a mysterious and powerful record that might be a formula for free energy to rebuild the lost civilization, an almanac for restoring earth to a Garden of Eden, or an ancient tome written by a man from the stars telling of mankind’s true beginning and ultimate destiny. Now three teenagers—Otero, Rhia, and Marc—set out to find the diary with the help of a clue found on an old computer and hints drawn from genetic memories. But a mysterious man pursues them relentlessly through the ruins of Denver into the Rocky Mountains; he knows the Phoenix Diary is everything the legends say and more. It is humanity’s past, present, and future. In this science fiction novel, three teens seeking a legendary diary race to stay ahead of an ancient warrior while learning about their past lives from their own genetic memories.
An Ubilaz, the bib of his grey overalls alight with moving symbols, dry heaved the customary greeting into the translator box on the table between himself and Otero. “I am your master. You must obey me.” Lesser beings were expected to cower but this one had troubled his interrogators to the point of confusion. Confusion was bad for the Ubilaz. Mentally, they possessed a predictable world view and anything out of place was best destroyed before too many questions arose. But they had given Stene their word not to harm this thing, or its two friends, and Ubilaz always kept their word. Which, as Stene liked to point out, is the only reason other species dealt with them at all. “I am Earth Mission Commander. I have adopted one of your names for this mission. You may call me Bob. I am not permitted to harm you, but I can leave you in this room until your body rots.” “No, you can’t Bob, because keeping me in this room would harm me.” The human youth looked unbeaten. Blood crusted in its ears. It seemed disorientated, maybe from the concussion grenade or the imprisonment and rough treatment. And it had to be hungry. But it wasn't beat. The Commander shifted in his tall chair, fitted with barstool legs to demonstrate his high rank and studied the pathetic little thing. Not losing his temper and ripping off its head was the result of long training. “Not if I see to your needs while waiting for you to die of old age.” These things lived short life spans. “And cause me extreme distress? You can’t do that either.” It could not know that! Had this thing seen their contract with Stene? Impossible! The only known copy was lost in the Main Bureaucracy. This would not do. As commander, he expected to succeed where his interrogators had failed. He wondered if they had simply asked, “Where are your two friends?” “I don’t know.” The expression on the thing's face indicated relief. It hadn't known the other two escaped! His interrogators probably never got past threatening it for not cooperating and, apparently, admitting they could not harm it. So threats were not going to work. However, he thought with a sense of superior satisfaction, as Commander I have another weapon. The ability to bribe was a requirement for his position. Most Ubilaz could not be bothered by such a waste of time and resources, preferring more direct approaches. But Commanders were trained in the difficult art of bribery. It was one of his many talents and he would use it to succeed where his subordinates had failed. First, a demonstration and a warning. “Do not be so sure we cannot force you to find your friends for us." He reached behind to a wall switch and turned the room lights off and on several times. These things burned candles in dark places. "We are superior beings, after all.” He paused to let the implications sink in. Now, the bribe, “But as a superior being, I can also grant you a wish. Whatever you want, I will give you immediately, or, have it here in a few days. What would you like to have in exchange for leading us to the girl? Hmm?” He leaned forward to look down upon his captive and just when the thing’s face appeared about to speak, he waved his finger and sweetened the deal. “The girl will not be harmed, nor will her protector. You and he will be set free. Include him too, in your wish. Go ahead; help him to forget his failure to protect the girl." He leaned back. "Tell me what you want for yourself and what you want for your friend.” Normally he would smile at this point, but these things did not seem reassured when an Ubilaz smiled at them. And this one smiled at him. “The Dyeu-dye. The girl for the crystal.” “This will all be recorded, of course,” the Commander began closing the deal when he realized, “What? We cannot do that. We do not have the Dyeu-dye. If we did, we would not trade it for a human!” Confusion disturbed Bob. “That would not make sense.” The damned thing was still smiling at him! His confusion increased when another Ubilaz came in and spit an urgent message on him. Stene was here. "I must go and attend to this." "Bye, Bob," the thing waved affably. "You are in charge," he told the messenger, who apparently could not understand why the prisoner was smiling. “You will die,” the messenger told Otero. That usually quieted prisoners. “I’m tired.” Otero put his head down on his arms. Satisfied the messenger's threat worked, Bob left him to watch the prisoner. In his experience, this was all guards did anyway.
G. D. Deckard decided at the age of seventeen to write about life; now, six grandchildren later, he hopes he's completed the necessary research. He currently lives in Naples, Florida.
 
 


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