Ghost Stories In North Carolina
  
Ghost Stories In North Carolina
(Every Haunted Place In North Carolina)
Published:
6/4/2012
Format:
E-Book (available as Mobi files) What's This
ISBN:
978-1-46890-548-9
ENDLESS true ghost stories in North Carolina. "Maybe there is a haunted area near you!"
Boojum, North Carolina's Bigfoot Bigfoot, the legendary, gigantic, man-like creature occasionally seen by hunters or hikers, is most of associated with the Pacific Northwest region of the United Sates and Canada. But stories of this shaggy creature come from all over the United States — the Florida Everglades are home to the foul-smelling Skunk Ape, the dark swamps of the bottom lands of southern Arkansas have the Boggy Creek Creature, and in the mountains of North Carolina sightings of the creature are occasionally still reported. The North Carolina version of Bigfoot seems to be a milder version of its Northwest cousin. The creature is usually said to be between six and eight feet tall, covered in shaggy grey hair, and to have a strong, unpleasant odor. But the creature is more often heard than seen, it's monkey-like howling has been heard up and down the mountains. The creatures are known by several names in North Carolina, and these names usually convey some of the affection that North Carolinians seem to feel for our hairy brethren. Knobby was the name given to a creature sighted on and off during the late 1970s around Carpenter's Knob near Toluca in Cleveland County. In Guilford county, the creature has picked up the commonly used southern expression for an unknown animal and come to be called the Wampus Cat. But the most interesting story of a North Carolina Bigfoot comes from Eagle Nest Mountain in Haywood County, where Boojum lived. Eagle Nest Mountain stands at the southern edge of the Balsam mountain range and was once home to the luxurious Eagle Nest Hotel, built in 1900 by a Mr. S.C. Satterthwait of Waynesville. Guests at the hotel soon began to hear the story of a strange creature who lived in the area. The thing was not quite a man and not quite an animal — it stood about eight feet tall and every inch of its body was covered with shaggy grey hair, except for its human face. The creature was named Boojum, and he seemed to be harmless enough, but he did have two all-too human habits. The first of these was the Boojum was greedy and he loved to hoard gems. Rubies and emeralds are found naturally throughout the mountains of North Carolina, and Boojum loved to hunt for these pretty, precious stones and hide them away in his own treasure hoards. Being a thrifty mountain type, he would scoop up the discarded liquor jugs thrown away by tourists and fill these with his gems. He would then bury them in one of the secret caves on the mountain that only he knew the whereabouts of. Boojum's second habit that made him a little more man than animal was that he loved to look at pretty girls. Back in those days, a young woman who wanted to have a bath might head off into the woods to find a secluded bond at the base of a waterfall. There, safe from human eyes, she could strip down to her naturalness and go about getting herself clean. But Boojum seemed to have some kind of sense about what was going on, and a young woman enjoying herself in the water would often hear a rustle in the bushes and look up to see his hairy face peering down at her. Now, most of these girls would quickly gather up their clothes and run off back home as soon as they saw him. But one young woman named Annie was braver than most, and one day when she was bathing in a stream deep in the balsam groves on Eagle Nest, she looked up and saw Boojum staring down at her. But Annie didn't run, in fact, she looked into Boojum's sorrowful eyes and saw that above all else he was just another lonely soul living on the mountain. Annie fell in love with those sad eyes, and she fell in love with Boojum, and she left her home and her family to go and live with Boojum deep in the mountain woods as his wife. As much as Boojum loved Annie, and as much as Annie loved Boojum, Boojum still hung on to his love of jewels. On certain nights, he would leave his bride alone and go searching for jewels on the mountain. Annie, growing lonely, would go out in search of Boojum, and she developed a peculiar holler, something that sounded like a cross between a monkey and a hooting owl, that she would use to call out to Boojum. Boojum would use the same cry to call back to her, and eventually the two calls would come closer together until they came together on the hills. Annie and Boojum calling to each other was often heard by guests at the Eagle Nest Hotel. Folklorist John Parris has said that Annie's owl-like holler was the source of the term "Hootenanny," which appeared in the language around the turn of the twentieth century and meant any kind of party or get-together. It was in the 1960s when the term was introduced to the wider public by Pete Seeger and Woodie Guthrie that it came to mean specifically a gathering of folk musicians.
Sean Mosley has been traveling the United States collecting ghost stories for years. And now he brings you more true creepy, scary stories from North Carolina.
 
 


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